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Tag Archives: John Green

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A couple of weeks ago the entire world celebrated Banned Books Week.  Okay maybe not the entire world, but a lot of librarians and English teachers did. Banned Books Week usually involves such activities as handing out bookmarks and challenging students to select and read a book from a list of commonly banned books.  And for the most part, that’s a good thing.  There are a lot of books on these lists that I have either bought for my children, read to them, or that I hope they will read one day.  I have wonderful memories of crying, no sobbing, with my kids when we read Bridge to Terabithia and Charlott’s Web.  In my English classes, I have taught Huckleberry FinnTo Kill a Mocking Bird,  and Lord of the Flies.   The Giver and Harry Potter are among my children’s favorite books.  And, while certainly not my favorite, my eldest daughter has read nearly all of  John Green ‘s books.

The fact is, it’s hard to imagine why many of these books were ever banned.  It’s just crazy.  But the crazy thing about the Banned Books Week movement is that proponents of the movement would have us believe that school libraries should be allowed to  provide young people with literally any book out there without having to justify the appropriateness of the book.  Any attempt to use discernment or determine age appropriateness is decried as censorship.  And those who call into question a librarian’s choices are considered a threat to intellectual freedom.

Please don’t misunderstand. I’m not advocating government censorship or that books be banned from public libraries.  But as a mother and a tax payer, I would like to think that when I send my children to school, they will not happen across books in the school library that include passages like this one from Cristina Garcia’s novel, Dreaming in Cuban (which is actually a Common Core recommended text for 10th graders).

“Hugo and Felicia stripped in their room, dissolving easily into one another, and made love against the whitewashed walls. Hugo bit Felicia’s breast and left purplish bands of bruises on her upper thighs. He knelt before her in the tub and massaged black Spanish soap between her legs. He entered her repeatedly from behind.

“Felicia learned what pleased him. She tied his arms above his head with their underclothing and slapping him sharply when he asked.

“‘You’re my bitch,’” Hugo said, groaning.

According to the good folks at the American Library Association, any attempt to restrict this novel, or anything libraries choose to make available to children, is a violation of the First Amendment.  The ALA lists Fifty Shades of Grey as one of the most commonly challenged books of 2013, but according to the ALA, a child’s right to read this book should be protected.  This is apparently more important than protecting children from pornography.

Fear Monger Much?

Fear Monger Much?

I realize that censorship is a slippery slope.  At least that’s what the Banned Books people want us to fear.  If we ban Fifty Shades of Grey, what’s to stop us from banning every book with any sexual content whatsoever?  Censorship is such a loaded word.  It implies a secret plot to restrict ideas or knowledge or a Big Brother-like control over information.  But what we are really talking about is limits.  And don’t schools limit kids already?   Students are not allowed to curse in school.  They cannot make racially insensitive statements.  They aren’t allowed to watch sexually explicit films in class – even those based on a classic novel.  When, where, and how they can pray is restricted.  And most schools have some form of a dress code in place.  All of these rules restrict (censor) students’ freedom of expression is some way. Can you imagine a high school or middle school where kids were allowed to express themselves absolutely any way they wanted too?

Still, the slippery slope concerns are valid.  Obviously book banning can get out of hand. Many books that are now considered classroom and childhood staples have at one time been challenged.  Yet, should we really advocate, indeed celebrate, the notion that our children can potentially have access to books with virtually any content with no adult discernment as to the appropriateness of those books?

Where things get tricky is when people challenge books based on their own personal beliefs.  Just because some people don’t believe that children should read books about witches and wizards, doesn’t mean the library should ban all Harry Potter books.  Some people might feel that children should not read books that encourage them to challenge authority.  That does not mean we need to ban Animal Farm.  I get it.  Discerning books is a delicate matter because what seems like a harmless story to one family might be considered gravely sinful by another.

Still, even with all the challenges involved with book restrictions, can’t we at least strive for some standard of decency?  That’s all I’m asking for.  A standard of decency.   Can’t we at least agree that there are some things a child or young teenager should not be exposed to?  Even the film industry does that much.  How about this? If the contents of a book would warrant an R rating as film, then maybe it should not be made available to 14 year olds.  It’s radical, I know.

It might not be easy.  Sometimes we might ere too much on the side of caution.  But the alternative is no standard of decency.  To me, that is a much more frightening prospect than the notion that my children’s freedom will somehow be violated because their public school denied them access to porn.

Really?

Really?

Disclaimer:  This is in no way a condemnation of librarians.  My own children’s schools are staffed by thinking, sensitive librarians who seek to provide our kids with the best possible age-appropriate literature.  We are grateful to have them.  

Image credits in order of appearance…

http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/

http://brkteenlib.tumblr.com/

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Debbie from Yulpa Reads has reviewed The Fault in Our Stars for us.  As a cancer survivor herself, she shares a unique perspective.

The Fault in Our Stars

Sixteen year old Hazel Grace Lancaster has terminal cancer, but because of a “Cancer Miracle,” has purchased for herself an unknown bit of time. She wishes to minimize the damage her death will cause by staying close to home, spending her time taking classes at the junior college, reading, and watching reality TV.  To please her parents, who are, as she says, the only ones in a worse position than she is, she attends a Cancer Kids Support Group.  There she meets Augustus Waters who had “a little touch of osteosarcoma a year and a half ago…but is on a roller coaster that only goes up”.  As their relationship slowly develops, Hazel shares her favorite book, An Imperial Affliction, with Augustus.  The author, Peter Van Houten, is the only person Hazel has come across who seems to understand what it was like to be dying but not have died.  An Imperial Affliction ends in mid-sentence. Hazel accepts that the main character, Anna, has died but wants to know what happens to everyone else in the novel.  She has written to the author many times without an answer.  Augustus makes it possible for the two of them (and Hazel’s mother) to go to Amsterdam to meet the reclusive author.
Does this sound like a book that is sweet, funny and life affirming?  Well, it is. The dialogue is witty and intelligent.  It is wonderful to watch these two young people fall in love despite their circumstances.  And it is particularly delightful to watch Hazel bloom and become stronger in spite of her frail body.
Violence
Very mild violence that involves the smashing of Augustus’ baseball trophies (with his permission) by their friend Isaac when he finds out his “forever” girlfriend dumped him because he was going to be blind.
Language
I remember a few mild appropriately descriptive words.
Sexual Content
Normally, I’d be disturbed about a sexual encounter between sixteen and seventeen year old kids, but in this case it felt life affirming. Others may disagree. Most of the explicit language was about her oxygen and his artificial leg.
Supernatural Elements

Hazel and Augustus and Hazel and her Dad have some discussions about what they think happens after death. And the Dutch Tulip Man, a character in Imperial Affliction, is a metaphor for God.
Personal Reflections
As a cancer survivor, I identified with Hazel. There is not even a hint of sentimentality in the book, no brave sacrifice, no heroic messages, just reality. Her story felt true, so I was not surprised to find at the end of the book an acknowledgement to Esther Grace Earl and her family.
Even a successful fight against cancer involves loss. Hazel’s lungs can no longer do their job alone and their friend, Isaac, must pay a price for survival that would horrify most of us, the loss of his eyes. Even without such side effects, the body that you are left with is not the same one you had before. John Green respects his readers enough to tell them the truth and believes they can handle it.
Hazel loved An Imperial Affliction because it was her story and an honest story. She wanted to know what happened to the other characters because if they were doing well, maybe her parents would be OK, too. I love The Fault In Our Stars because it is an authentic story of hope and the daring to risk love in the face of death.
To find out more about the foundation created in Esther Earl’s honor go to tswgo.org .
Unlike Peter van Houten, John Green answers questions about his books. You can read some of them at johngreenbooks.com

End note from Laura Catherine – I LOVED the book.  It was funny and clever and profound.  But I have to give my “mom of two young girls” disclaimer.  The sexual encounter between Augustus and Hazel is not graphic or steamy, but it would be the thing that would prevent me from recommending this for middle schoolers and younger teens.